Shelbyville, Tennessee to New Caney, Texas

Today is one of those days it is better to be snuggled indoors. Wind driven rain with gusts well over 30 miles per hour. A head wind to be exact. Joe is fighting to keep our pickup in our lane of the highway.

Some areas around Houston have flooded streets. Beaumont, Texas further east is fairing just as bad. Lake Charles, Louisiana is being pelted by the rains and strong winds.

A bridge over Prien Lake which connects to the Gulf Ocean looked quite ominous to me as I watched the high bridge get closer.

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Water on the lake had waves dancing in the wind to the tunes of vehicle engines straining up the incline against the force of the wind pushing back.

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A working tug boat struggled below us.

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Our route, dead heading, to Shelbyville, Tennessee will be the same going back to New Caney, Texas which is a little north and east of Houston.

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We’ve left the wide open landscapes of New Mexico featuring rain, wind, and occasional spots of hail

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for tree lined highways with stout winds and rain through Louisiana.

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Crossing over the Atchafalaya Swamp near Baton Rouge, Louisiana on an overcast and rainy day has enabled me to get a few good photos.

The first is a satellite view of the swamp.

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In Lobdel, Louisiana – a suburb of Baton Rouge – a bridge named for a very crooked politician. Huey P. Long. His famed corruption was a laundry list of crimes likened to any Mafia don in the 1930’s and 1940’s.

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The upper deck of the bridge is for train traffic sandwiched between east bound and west bound vehicle traffic.

Views from the top of the bridge are spectacular. The Huey P. Long bridge spans the Mississippi River.

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A rotting pier, long neglected, is seen on the eastern bank of the Mississippi.

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Those of you that have hung in with me saw some of these photos last year when we moved a lot of Wal-Mart trucks from Opelousas, Louisiana to Tunica, Mississippi.

Okay that’s enough for today. We won’t be traveling any where near New Orleans for interesting pictures.

Have a fantastic weekend everyone.

Leslie

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About Message In A Fold

I am an over the road truck driver in Drive-Away Transport part of the year, and the sole bookkeeper of this operation the other part of the year. I do a lot of whining until I can get in my craft room and play with paper and glue. View all posts by Message In A Fold

4 responses to “Shelbyville, Tennessee to New Caney, Texas

  • gardenpinks

    Some fantastic views from the ‘crooked man’s’ bridge and those rivers levels looked way up. I would have been very apprehensive going over that steep bridge in those winds. Wonder if that section ever gets closed to high sided vehicles in very windy weather? Some of our bridges over the River Severn do get closed to all vehicles during high winds especially the Clifton Suspension bridge built by Isambard Kingdom Brunel http://www.cliftonbridge.org.uk/ It is a fantastic construction but you would not want to be on that when the wind is gusting!

    Love and hugs
    Lynn xx

    • Message In A Fold

      Wow! Totally amazing link to the bridge in your world. What blows my mind is that bridge was created before CAD, long before computers were any kind of concept, and before electric generators were in use.

      Thanks so much for the awesome link.

      Love you – Leslie

  • gardenpinks

    Isambard Kingdom Brunel was a man of genius, he built many bridges, railways, tunnels for canals and iron ships!
    Another of his bridges that I love is the one that crosses the River Tamar, we have crossed that bridge many times when travelling from Plymouth to Cornwall. As my father-in-law would say Brunel had more in his head than lice 🙂

    Love and hugs
    Lynn xx

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